JESUS DRIVES ME CRAZY

I got in about midnight last night. It was great to see Lea and Cooper, and simply be at a place you call home.
The Honduras trip has been an amazing adventure. It was a journey that I won’t forget for a lifetime. Many of the events, faces and smells are burned in my memory. From the smiles of the beautiful children at the Casa de Esperanza, to the filth and hunger of the people of the dump, I’m both glad and sad that I experienced it.
Here are a few things I wrote down in my journal, that I’m still trying to process. My hope is that writing them here will help me…. and yes, it’s pretty random stuff.
  • A trip to a third world country is risky, but a life without risk is no life at all. God called us to take risks, so don’t settle for a life without risks.
  • I realized just how blessed I am in this world. We have an abundance of everything from food, clothing and stuff. But I also realized that just “realizing how blessed we are” is not enough. Feeling sorry for the hungry and the poor of this world is NOT what Jesus was looking for from me. These people don’t need our sympathy or our pity, they need our compassion. The same compassion that the Good Samaritan had, one that took action. For me to sit back and simply say, “How sad,” makes me no different than the Priest and Levite that passed on the other side.
  • Many cannot go to Honduras or other third world counties, so what do you do? Find your own Honduras. If we look around us through the eyes of Jesus, we’re sure to find a Honduras close by. It may be a family down the street, a co-worker or a single mother who supports her family on a minimum wage job. You can find your Honduras in Childress, Dallas or anywhere, when we begin to see people through the eyes of Jesus.
  • Jesus drives me crazy (in a good way of course). He’s not happy with me taking up my easy-chair, he demands that I take up my cross, and crosses aren’t always fun, comfortable or easy. Couldn’t he simply be satisfied with me just going to church? Instead he demands that I “be and do” church, in the lives of others. Why did he have to say, “I was hungry and you fed me, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink… and whatever you do for the least of these you did for me…”? I’m glad I got the chance to see Jesus in Honduras. He was everywhere and you had to really pay attention to see him, because he was disguised as the homeless, the hungry and the children.
  • It’s dangerous to ask God why He allows poverty and suffering in this world, because He would probably ask us the same question.

I’m planning another “Dump Fund” fund-raiser for next spring, but if you’d like to give something now to feed the hungry people of Honduras, you can send it here:

Torch
PO Box 9222
Columbus MS 39705.
In the mean time, we’re planning another fundraiser that I’ll tell you about tomorrow. :)
This picture was from our visit to the children’s cancer wing at the hospital in Honduras. The little dog was one of the many stuffed animals that were donated for our trip.
Children lined up and waiting for lunch at the feeding center.

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Article by Trey Morgan

I am a Christian husband and father, who moonlights as the minister for the church of Christ in Childress, Texas. My wife Lea and I have been married for 25 years. We are doing our best to raise our 4 boys, who are all growing up way too fast. Read 1182 articles by
13 Comments Post a Comment
  1. Tim Archer says:

    Glad you had a great time.

    "It's dangerous to ask God why He allows poverty and suffering in this world, because He would probably ask us the same question."

    I've heard a similar quote. It's a good thing to keep in mind.

    Keep inspiring us, Trey!

  2. Doug Young says:

    " These people don't need our sympathy or our pity, they need our compassion. The same compassion that the Good Samaritan had, one that took action. For me to sit back and simply say, "How sad," makes me no different than the Priest and Levite that passed on the other side."

    This is the statement of the day. Canonize it into what I call Greatness, because it is.

    I appreciate you more than you'll ever know. Christ in YOU inspires those who respect you. May God continue to work wonders through you and your family!

  3. That Girl says:

    When I was trying to decide if I wanted to go to Honduras on the first trip. One of the men going with us told me that it would change me forever. I realized that I wasn't sure I wanted to be changed.

    He was right, of course. I wish I could keep that feeling all the time but I fall back into my old ways pretty quickly.

    Thank you for going and doing what you have done and for showing the rest of us how to do what needs to be done.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Trey, you have been "ruined" and that is NOT meant to be a bad thing either. :-)

    Keep "processing" your time because it is both a blessing and an inspiration to us!

    Sherry Hubright

  5. Anonymous says:

    I am so thankful all of you are home safe and sound. I'm glad you went, I followed your steps each day. You even inspire this old sick lady who doesn't do much these days but go to doctors and labs. I have learned to smile and speak to each person I meet. I've even learned to say, God Bless You to the others sick around me. And to answer "fine" when they ask questions of me. It's not much but it's what I can do. Do you think now that you had a poor life growing up? gmj

  6. NB says:

    "Find your own Honduras" – great advice!

  7. Josh Linton says:

    Trey,

    Glad you're back.

    What you're saying is true about finding a Honduras close to home. In Kiowa county (Oklahoma), the regional food bank reported today that more than 400 families sought and qualified for assistance. People are hungry in our own backyards. Thanks for the updates and thought provoking thoughts.

    Josh

  8. Marc T says:

    Trey, We are amazed and awed at the the people that our God puts in our lives. You, your boys, Ricky, and Keith came here and blessed us! Terri and I both know that we have the best job in the world and we also have been blessed with the most amazing, wonderful, and loving brothers and sisters to work with.
    The house for Eathan today was awesome. The lady cried when I told her about the memory house. Her name was Alma which is translated as "Soul". Much like the memory house we built on Saturday, it was a great day.
    See you soon – I hope!
    Marc

  9. TREY MORGAN says:

    Tim & Doug – Thank you my friends.

    Terri – I know "that feeling" won't last, it just won't. But I do plan to ride it as long as possible. And, I'm going to try and refill it as often as possible too :)

    Sherry – I hope I continue to be "ruined." :)

    GMJ – You are a sweetie. I've seen those smiles and they are smiles and they are special.

    Josh – You are 100% right.

    Marc – Glad we encouraged one another. I know the "Ethan House" was an awesome build. I have no doubt that Becky thought it was special. I can't think of a better way to honor someone than building a house in their memory.

  10. Stoogelover says:

    When a trip like that isn't life changing, that's a sad commentary on one's life! I know even more good will come from your trip … and I am glad you are giving some of us who can't make those trips any longer (I made many of them) a chance to still be involved.

    On the other hand, I wish I could share the amazing ministry that occurred today outside an ER as I was taking a precious mother to the mortuary and the encounter with her family. A divine appointment!

  11. tmarty says:

    I am going print out this post and hang it on my fridge as a reminder to "be the church" not just go to church. Great mission posts. They touched me.

  12. patrick mead says:

    Well done, Trey. I was raised a missionary kid. You're right — missions are dangerous. Not only do you put yourself in a difficult and unfamiliar place, you open yourself to change.

    God bless those you touched in Honduras.

  13. Anonymous says:

    The secret to life: Philippians 4:12b-13

About Me

Trey Morgan Here are my thoughts about marriage, family, raising children, humor, faith and the life God intended for us all. I am a Christian husband and father, who moonlights as the minister for the church of Christ in Childress, Texas. My wife Lea and I have been married for 25 years. We are doing our best to raise our 4 boys, who are all growing up way too fast.

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